• HRE – Excelsior

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    Here is the stunning “Excelsior,” which found its home in the customer lounge at HRE’s Vista, California headquarters. The legs are made from GE-manufactured shaft assemblies used for the CFM-56 engines on Boeing 737-3 and 737-4 aircraft. The counter base is component of a Pratt & Whitney JT9 engine used for the Boeing 747-100 with approximately 30,000 cycles on it. For the bar top, Marc called on Mel Gragirena at L.A. Fabricators to build a custom one out of Black Walnut for its rich, dark color. There is a display case for one of HRE’s custom wheels in the top, itself a paragon of industrial design coveted by automobile aficionados.

    NOT FOR SALE.

  • Lunar Module Table

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    “The Eagle has Landed….” Rarely have words captivated an entire nation like those did. Every man, woman, and child were fixated to their television to see those brave men take a step that no American had ever taken. This one of a kind table evokes memories of that historic day. We start with a Jet Engine Heat Diffuser that has seen over 28,000 cycles, and many millions of miles in the air, probably circling the globe like those men of Apollo 11 did. We then add a Riser from an engine assembly, encircle it with a stator, and finish it off with a powered bladed out disc that was an internal part of a 737 jet engine. LED lighting illuminates the Heat Diffuser’s base, thereby creating the look of rocket thrust. Every nut and bolt on this piece has been salvaged from aircraft components, making the total aviation parts used on this piece 24. At over $500,000 in retail cost, this truly is a piece of art.

  • Voyager

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  • Lunar Landing Table

    lunarLandingTable

    “The Eagle has Landed….” Rarely have words captivated an entire nation like those did. Every man, woman, and child were fixated to their television to see those brave men take a step that no American had ever taken. This one of a kind table evokes memories of that historic day. We start with a Heat Diffuser that has seen over 28,000 cycles, and many millions of miles in the air, probably circling the globe like those men of Apollo 11 did. We then add a Riser from an engine assembly, and finish it off with a powered bladed out disc that was an internal part of a 737 jet engine. LED lighting illuminates the Heat Diffuser’s base, thereby creating the look of rocket thrust. Every nut and bolt on this piece has been salvaged from aircraft components, making the total aviation parts used on this piece 24. At over $500,000 in retail cost, this truly is a piece of art.